PRC EAST In-School Programs

PRC’s programs introduce participants to regional and global environmental issues and offer unique solutions easily addressed by students. Programs can be scheduled at a school or as a field trip to PRC’s facility in Ridley Creek State Park (Delaware County). All of PRC’s programs align with PA Department of Education standards and are a valuable resource for meeting “Environment and Ecology” and “Science and Technology” standards.

Currently, some of PRC’s school programs are free, with fees covered by grant funds. Programs are conducted for individual classes or as small assemblies. Please call for further information. For further information or to schedule a program, please contact Diana Andrejczak at 610-353-1555 x232 or andrejczak@prc.org.

For information about how your business can make a donation to PRC through PA’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) Program please click here.  These donations allow us to offer our programs free of charge to public schools and provide tax credits for your business.

Renewable Energy Program

Students will learn about the process of creating electricity and how alternative energies are used to generate electricity. Students will also learn about renewable and non-renewable resources, energy trends and actions they can take to conserve energy.

Objectives:

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic electricity generation by building a model to demonstrate how electricity is created.
  • Students will be able to define renewable and non-renewable energy.
  • Students will be able to classify forms of energy as either renewable or non-renewable.
  • Students will be able to describe the following alternative energies: hydro, methane, solar, wind, biomass, geothermal
  • Students will be able to make recommendations on how to conserve energy.

Watershed Awareness Program

The watershed awareness program focuses on the importance of water, what a watershed is, how water moves through a watershed as well as how pollution impacts a watershed. The students will work with an enviroscape model that allows them to put various “pollutants” in the watershed and then use water bottles to simulate rain. This allows the students to see how water travels through a watershed as well as see the various pollutants that enter our waterways that may otherwise be invisible in our water system. The program ends with a discussion/demonstration on the model of ways in which we can protect our water and watersheds.  This program can be presented alone or as an introduction to the Stream Health program.

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to define the term watershed and identify the watershed in which they live.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate how water moves through a watershed.
  • Student will be able to differentiate between point and non-point source pollution.
  • Students will be able to discuss the human impact on watersheds and how we affect and in turn are affected by the health of our watersheds.
  • Students will be able to make recommendations on how to reduce the impact of pollutants on water quality.

Litter and Recycling Program

Students will learn the ins and outs of recycling and gain the skills to reduce litter and help the environment. This program features the history of litter, what is litter, the hazards that litter presents for the environment, how students can help stop litter, and what to recycle.

Objectives:

  • Students will identify how human actions affect environmental health.
  • Students will be able to define reduce, reuse and recycle.
  • Students will be able to distinguish between items that are compostable, recyclable or trash.
  • Students will recognize how materials are recycled into new products.
  • Students will be able to give examples of practices that are eco-friendly.
  • Students will be able to describe the role of recycling in relation to waste management.

Stream Health - Outdoor Program

This program is presented at a local pond or stream accessible to the school. Students test chemical and biological properties of the water to help determine the water quality.  This includes sampling and identifying macroinvertebrates.  Macroinvertebrates serve as indicators of water quality, so the students use their findings to help assess the water quality of the stream or pond.  This program can be presented alone or as a follow up to the Watershed Awareness program.

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain how macroinvertebrates are indicators of water quality.
  • Students will test the chemical properties of the pond (pH, temperature) and use this data to help determine the stream’s health.
  • Students will conduct a sampling of the macroinvertebrates that live in the pond and use the findings to help assess the stream’s water quality.
  • Students will practice using field guides as tools to identify macroinvertebrates using visual observations of physical attributes.
  • Students will be able to discuss the human impact on water quality and how we affect and in turn are affected by the health of our watersheds.

Stream Health - Classroom Program

This is an indoor version of the Stream Health program.  Using samples that had been pre-collected and preserved, students are able to observe and identify macroinvertebrates that are found in local streams.  Macroinvertebrates serve as indicators of water quality, so the students use their findings to help assess the water quality of the stream or pond.  This program can be presented alone or as a follow up to the Watershed Awareness program.

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain how macroinvertebrates are indicators of water quality.
  • Students will practice using field guides as tools to identify macroinvertebrates using visual observations of physical attributes.
  • Students will identify a sampling of macroinvertebrates and use the findings to assess the water quality.
  • Students will be able to discuss the human impact on water quality and how we affect and in turn are affected by the health of our watersheds.

Wild About Birds

Students test their wings comfortably as they are introduced to the world of birds with an inviting blend of discovery and fun. Students learn what characteristics define a bird, and how to identify birds using field guides through a fun game of “Who am I?” Students then put their new skills to the test while trying to identify birds outside in their environment.

Objectives:

  • Students will learn that adaptations are important for survival.
  • Students will be able to define the term adaptations.
  • Students will compare and contrast the attributes of birds to those of other animals.
  • Student will observe, identify and document different species of birds.
  • Students will practice using field guides as tools to identify birds based on visual observations of physical attributes.
  • Students will record data, interpret information and form conclusions.

Exelon's Energy Education Field Trip

Since 2008, PRC has partnered with Exelon to provide educational programming at Exelon’s Energy Education Center in Fairless Hills, PA.

Exelon’s Energy Education Center educates visitors in the science of using non-traditional resources for the production of electricity.

The center is designed for students in grades 3 – 8 and features a curriculum based upon the Pennsylvania Department of Education’s Environment and Ecology standards. The center offers many activities to help teach visitors about energy including:

  • An interactive Exhibit Hall where you can construct a pipeline to transport landfill gas, build a solar panel to help power Solar City, or design and test your own wind turbine to see how much energy it can produce.
  • A Game Show Area where you can compete against other visitors in a game to make your house more energy efficient.
  • A classroom presentation that teaches students the about how electricity is generated, renewable and non-renewable energy resources, and a hands-on activity where students try to construct their own version of a generator.
  • A tour of turbine hall is also included when possible. (Tours are dependent on what is occurring in Turbine Hall on that day as it is part of a working power plant.)

For more information or to schedule a trip to the center, please contact Diana Andrejczak at 610-353-1555 ext 232.

If you would like any additional information about Exelon or the center, please visit the link below. http://www.exeloncorp.com/PowerPlants/fairlesshills/educationcenter/overview.aspx